Rob Shea Photography

Rollei Infrared Film First look

Point Reyes shipwreck shot with Rollei Infrared 400 film
Canon AE-1, 24mm f/2.8, Rollei Infrared film, Hoya R72 filter, f/11, 1/8 second

This is my first look at the Rollei Infrared B&W negative ISO 400 film in 35mm. This film is sensitive to visible light and near-IR up to 820nm. It can be shot at ISO 400 to produce a typically B&W image with some near-IR light. With an R72 (720nm) filter, you can capture only a small slice of red visible light, plus near-IR up to 820nm. However, this will reduce light transmission and require a lower ISO to get a proper exposure.

Conclusion

With an R72 filter, for low contrast subjects or vistas with haze, drop ISO by 2 or 3 stops, to ISO 100 or ISO 50. I would like to test this further with another roll.

With an R72 filter, for high contrast or close subjects, drop ISO by 4 or 5 stops, to ISO 25 or ISO 12.

While I’ve seen others indicating that this film could be used with an R72 filter dropping ISO by 6 or 7 stops, all of my test shots with these settings lacked any contrast.

Point Reyes shipwreck shot with Rollei Infrared 400 film
Canon AE-1, 24mm f/2.8, Rollei Infrared film, Hoya R72 filter, f/11, 1/8 second

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